Volumetric Geometrics

Growing up, many of my precious moments were spent drawing and creating objects and shapes out of everything. My more exciting moments in any school activities had something and everything to do with geometry, exposing properties of space related with distance, shape, size, and relative position of figures.



As I evolve into a creative butterfly through the years, I still find myself creating in shapes and patterns that represent geometry in 3-D form and space which is the basis of most designed objects in art.


Following the history around geometric models including straight line, round, triangle, square and rhombus often appear in ancient works. Examples include the painted-pottery culture and traditional sculptures in China’s Neolithic age, the western murals in ancient Egypt, the continuous patterns in Greece, the folk arts in Africa and many more which fully reflect the creativity and out limit of space-time as well as region of these primitive simple geometries.


Geometric art, a phase of Greek art characterised largely by geometric motifs in vase painting flourished towards the end of the Greek Dark Ages, c. 900–700 BC making way for geometric-inspired fashion to follow.


In reference to fashion, fabric is a two dimensional shape but when it is constructed as a garment surrounding the human body, it becomes a three dimensional form. Fashion designers, who have to have a spatial way of thinking like architects are able to translate a two dimensional material (cloth) into a three dimensional form (body-shaped garment).


Liz Ogumbo Fashion: Volumetric Geometrics

As Fashion undoubtedly draws inspiration from geometry, I have been inspired to create a variety of geometric collections through the years for style enthusiasts and lovers who appreciate these different aspects of 3-D fashion, 3-D prints and geometry in fashion.


Generally, when I create geometric-inspired pieces, I create the geometric shape as the foundation or basic shape from which the rest of the garment is crafted. Through the process, the most important aspect of my geometric-inspired fashion is wearability. Fashion is crafted to be worn and enjoyed; if you can’t wear it and run the city, what’s the point?


Skirts:

I think about the triangular shape to create that A-line feel while pushing it a little further to create structure that can hold the triangle to bring in a 3-D illusion. After all, what’s fashion if you can’t have fun creating it and even more fun wearing it?


Liz Ogumbo Fashion: Volumetric Geometrics

This skirt can be worn with a fitting blouse or alternatively a chiffon blouse tucked in to allow the balance around your silhouette, the volume of the skirt and the skirt itself to make fashionable sense.


Dresses:

I think about the triangle as my form for the bottom part of the dress all-down to the hemline and the top and waist have to fit to allow the geometric angle of the dress to actually stand out.



This dress can be worn with geometric poncho if you want to cover up your shoulders for a modest outing. Alternatively, you can wear it without the poncho and still look good, feel good and turn heads all at the same time.


Poncho:


Liz In Liz Ogumbo Volumetric Geometrics

I have a great appreciation for the poncho and therefore I create different shapes to hang on to the shoulder for an element of ‘Je ne sais quoi.’ The poncho works to add a hint of drama while keeping it modest. You can wear the poncho with any sweetheart neckline, sleeveless/ no-sleeve dress, blouse, bustier or bralette. Occasionally, I wear the poncho to accessorize over a simple plain body-hugging maxi dress/gown.


Sleeves:


Liz In Liz Ogumbo Volumetric Geometrics

I certainly enjoy the play on sleeves and that is another element of geometry I apply in any style of dress, jacket or blouse.

Fashion is fun, Let yourself play.


Yours fabulously,


Liz Ogumbo - Regisford

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